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Memorial Sloan Kettering

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center is the world's oldest and largest institution dedicated to cancer research and care.

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

EIN: 
13-1924236
CFC Number: 
95466

The international leader in the field, Memorial Sloan Kettering is uniquely poised to make a direct tangible impact on cancer research and care on a global scale. Many therapies that are today considered the standard of cancer care were first pioneered at MSK. For example, Memorial Sloan Kettering was the first institution to successfully perform a bone marrow transplant from an unrelated donor, a breakthrough that dramatically increased the number of patients for which this lifesaving procedure is available. Memorial Sloan Kettering has also produced more FDA approved drugs for the treatment of cancer in the past four decades than any other single academic institution.

Most recently, MSK spearheaded efforts that led to the FDA approval of ipilimumab (Yervoy) and vemurafenib (Zelboraf) for the treatment of advanced melanoma. These drugs represent the first new treatments for this type of cancer in nearly two decades. Each year, MSK counts more than 24,000 inpatient and 500,000 outpatient visits to its main campus in New York City and regional sites. While many of our patients reside in the tri-state area of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut, many others travel from across the country and around the globe to seek our care.

Indeed, MSK treats more women with breast cancer, more men with prostate cancer, and more children with cancer than any other institution in the world. This is in part because MSK is renowned for its expertise in treating rare, difficult, or advanced cancers, often providing treatment options not available elsewhere. And MSK's is working to bring its world-class care to physicians at local and community medical centers worldwide. In a new partnership with IBM, MSK will combine its clinical knowledge, existing molecular and genomic data, and vast repository of cancer case histories with IBM's Watson computer and its natural language processing ability. The goal is to give oncologists located anywhere the ability to obtain detailed diagnostic and treatment options based on updated research that will help them decide how best to care for an individual patient.